Nutrition

 

Nutritional based articles straight from cutandjacked.com's specialist writers 

Posted 25 October 2011 by Anna from proteinpow

Recipe: High Protein


Creme Brulee

Protein Creme Brulee (Makes Four)

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 heaping scoop of vanilla casein (I used 32g of ON's vanilla but feel free to add more)
  • 1 pack of unflavored gelatin powder (11g's worth).
  • 2 cups of milk

DIRECTIONS:

Heat up the milk (I used coconut milk from a carton but one could also use almond milk, hazelnut milk, hemp milk, or just regular cow's or goat's milk). When the milk is hot but not boiling (i.e. when you can stick your finger in and it feels hot but obviously not scalding), add the milk to the casein + gelatine and WHISK. Let it sit in the fridge for a few hours until it nicely congeals. Dig in!

MACROS:

73kcals, 3g carbos, 8.6g protein and 2.5g fat per serving

Recipe by Anna from proteinpow.com

Posted 24 October 2011 by Matt Karstetter

Matt Karstetter’s 5 Tips That


Can Make all the Difference

Matt Karstetter’s 5 Tips That Can
Make all the Difference:

1. Maximum Growth

1. Maximum Growth - Eat every two hours, approximately 50 grams of Carbs and 50 grams protein. If needed wear a wristwatch and set a timer for every two hours. Make the last meal of the day a protein shake. (50% Whey Protein, 50% Casein Protein) This will help fuel your body overnight.

2. Alternate Carb & Protein Sources

2. Alternate Carb & Protein Sources – Change the carb and protein source each meal.

Example: Meal #1 Chicken & Rice, Meal #2 Steak & Sweet Potatoes, Meal #3 Ground Turkey and White Potatoes. You can repeat the same meal more than once in same day, just don’t eat the same meal back to back.

3. Train Controlled

3. Train Controlled – Control and Isolate the specific body part, both on the descent and ascent of each movement and focus on correct form. The pace of your reps should stay the same when going up or down. Slow the descent to add negative resistance for additional stimulation.

4. Contraction

4. Contraction – Make a point to pause and squeeze at the top and bottom of each movement. Reduce weight if needed to get the adequate contraction at the top and bottom to keep full range of motion and proper form.

5. Water

5. Water – Water plays a role in nearly ever function of the human body. Consumption depends on size of the person, supplementation, diet, lifestyle, etc., but two gallons of water is generally a good daily goal most gym rats. Urine color is a good gauge to judge hydration as odd as it may sound. Keep your urine clear and you are doing a good job of keeping hydrated. Multi-vitamins however will dramatically affect color and is completely normal, so be mindful of this when analyzing your level of hydration.

Facebook: Matt Karstetter

Posted 28 October 2011 by Ashley P. Cologlu

Recipe: Simple


Healthy Stir-Fry

Simple Healthy Stir-Fry! (makes 2 “very filling” servings)

Ingredients:

  • *8 oz. Boneless skinless chicken breast ~or~ *8 oz. Shrimp
  • *1 lb. Veggies (frozen plain stir-fry veggies are easiest)
  • *1 cup brown rice
  • *1 - 2 tbsp. Kikkoman low sodium stir-fry sauce
  • *salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

  • Cook chicken or shrimp on skillet using light coat of pam cooking spray.
  • Remove from skillet and dice chicken into tiny pieces.
  • Add chicken, vegetables, rice, and ½ serving of stir-fry sauce back to skillet.
  • Cook for 10-15 minutes on medium heat, covered, stirring often until veggies are fully heated.
  • *Drizzle remaining stir-fry sauce and enjoy!

Stats:

Nutrition facts per serving:
303 calories / 1 gram fat / 34.5 carbs / 31.5 protein

Need this to be lower in carbs?
Cut out the rice and save about 15 grams of carbs per serving!

Recipe by Ashley P. Cologlu

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Posted 18 October 2011 by Brad Borland, MA, CSCS

Building Muscle & Burning Fat


Simultaneously - is it possible?

Do you often find yourself at a crossroads regarding keeping your hard-earned mass that you so tirelessly worked towards only to see it dwindle away as you diet down? Are you a “hardgainer” that has to fight for every ounce of muscle scared to death of reducing calories to get a more muscular midsection? More calories in equals more mass and fewer calories in equals less body fat – and it’s one or the other – right?

The age-old question if is it possible to gain muscle and burn fat simultaneously has been debated for many years. There are so many opinions from experts to people in the trenches that it is very difficult to sift through to the facts. Most will tell you that you must choose between the two in order to reach optimum success and that attempting both at the same time is futile. So why not just give up, reduce calories and sacrifice the muscle for better abs and more muscular arms?

Because you are better than that! You will find a way and put into practice a concise plan of action to reach your ultimate potential. The guidelines and plan included here are designed to help you not only keep, but build muscle while simultaneously burn body fat. It can be done with a little planning, discipline and hard work.

The Right Amounts

One of the single, most imperative principles in this plan is to eat the right amounts of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates and fats). By manipulating these foods and staying strict with the guidelines your goals will soon be in range. Diet is so important that without adhering to these principles you will surely never reach your physique goals.

Protein

Protein: As the main source for building muscle, protein is absolutely necessary for your muscle-building strategy. Take in around 1 to 1.5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight (this equates to 180-270 grams for a 180 pound individual). This will guarantee that your muscles will be getting the correct dose of amino acids for maintaining and building muscle tissue. Some prime sources are chicken, lean steak, fish, turkey, ground meat, eggs, cottage cheese, Greek yogurt and protein powders.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates: Carbohydrate is a great muscle-sparing energy source. This particular macronutrient will be drastically manipulated as the diet plan goes along and will play a major roll in its success so be extremely mindful of your intake on a daily basis. Be sure to have an intake mainly of complex carbohydrates and fiber. Sources include brown rice, wild rice, sweet potatoes, whole wheat bread, wheat pasta, vegetables, some fruits and Ezekiel products.

Fats

Fats: Never count out a healthy fat. Certain fats are essential regarding maintaining hormones such as testosterone, increasing fat burning and aiding energy levels. Healthy fats will be utilized to replace carbohydrate on certain days to keep blood sugar levels steady and help with satiety. Good sources include avocado, walnuts, almonds, olive oil, natural peanut butter, some egg yolks and sunflower seeds.

Light the Furnace!

Now let’s look at how we can implement these macronutrients and manipulate them in such a way as to build more strength and mass while torching our fat stores. Protein levels will stay somewhat the same throughout the plan. You need that steady stream of amino acids to feed to the muscles for recuperation and repair to take place. Try out one gram per pound of bodyweight and assess your progress. If you find yourself stalling, try to up it to 1.25 or 1.5 grams per pound and then reassess. That is about as high as you will want to go with protein – the rest is up to carbohydrate and fat manipulation. Give each change in protein amount about four weeks before reassessing.

Here is the tricky part. Now you will start to manipulate carbohydrate in such a way as to trick the body into delving into its fat stores for fuel. You will have high, medium and low consumption days. You will eat low carbs for two to four days followed by medium and high days. On the low days your body will burn fat for fuel and save muscle so as long as your protein intake is high enough. Before you starve your body of energy after so many days of low carbs (which if prolonged could lead to lower testosterone levels and metabolism) you will have a day of moderate carbs and another day of high carbs. This will shuttle in fuel to the muscle, rev back up your metabolism and be burned without storing body fat. Carbohydrate intake will be approximately .5 grams per pound of bodyweight for low days (90 grams for a 180 pounder), 1.5 grams per pound on medium days (270 grams) and 2.25 grams per pound on high days (405 grams).

Fat intake should hover around .25 grams per pound of bodyweight or 20-30% of total calories. However, on low carbohydrate days it would be wise to increase your healthy fat intake slightly. This will ensure your hormone levels will stay steady and will supply you with ample energy for your grueling workouts. On the low carb days simply increase your fat intake by 50%. Remember that one gram of fat has over twice the amount of calories of carbs, so a little goes a long way. For example, if you had half of an avocado on a salad, now on low carb days you will eat ¾ of an avocado.

The Muscle-Building Fat-Torching Sample Diet

 

Low Carbohydrate Days

Meal 1
3 eggs and 4 egg whites
½ cup oatmeal (dry measure)
Cinnamon for taste
1 tablespoon of natural peanut butter

Meal 2
2 scoops of whey protein powder mixed in water or 1 cup Greek yogurt
1.5 ounces of almonds

Meal 3
6-8 ounces of meat, fish or chicken
Green salad with 3 tablespoons of olive oil dressing

Meal 4 (preworkout)
½ of an apple or banana
1 scoop of whey protein powder mixed in water

Meal 5 (postworkout)
2 scoops of whey protein powder mixed in water

Meal 6
6-8 ounces of meat, fish or chicken
Broccoli, green beans or peas or green salad with ½ avocado

Medium Carbohydrate Days

Meal 1
3 eggs and 4 egg whites
1 cup oatmeal (dry measure)
Cinnamon for taste
1 tablespoon of natural peanut butter

Meal 2
2 scoops of whey protein powder mixed in water or 1 cup Greek yogurt
1 ounce of almonds
1 apple

Meal 3
6-8 ounces of turkey with two slices of wheat bread and 1 tablespoon of light mayonase
Green salad with 2 tablespoons of olive oil dressing

Meal 4 (preworkout)
1 banana
1 scoop of whey protein powder mixed in water

Meal 5 (postworkout)
2 scoops of whey protein powder mixed in water
12 ounces of Gatorade

Meal 6
6-8 ounces of meat, fish or chicken
Broccoli, green beans or peas or green salad with ¼ avocado
1 cup of wild rice cooked

High Carbohydrate Days

Meal 1
3 eggs and 4 egg whites
1 ½ cup oatmeal (dry measure)
Cinnamon for taste
½ tablespoon of natural peanut butter

Meal 2
2 scoops of whey protein powder mixed in water or 1 cup Greek yogurt
1 ounce of almonds
1 apple

Meal 3
6-8 ounces of fish
Green salad with 2 tablespoons of olive oil dressing
1 ½ cup of wild rice cooked

Meal 4 (preworkout)
1 banana
1 scoop of whey protein powder mixed in water

Meal 5 (postworkout)
2 scoops of whey protein powder mixed in water
12 ounces of Gatorade

Meal 6
6-8 ounces of meat, fish or chicken
Broccoli, green beans or peas or green salad with ¼ avocado
1 medium sweet potato

By Brad Borland, M.A., CSCS: WorkoutLabs.net

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Posted 08 October 2011 by Michael Kory

Video: Healthy Homemade


Chicken & Cheese Pita Nachos

Healthy Homemade Chicken & Cheese Pita Nachos

Previous episode, how to make Pita Chips:
cutandjacked.com/Video-healthy-pita-chips

By Recipe by Michael Kory

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Posted 10 October 2011 by JC Deen

Get Ripped With


Intermittent Fasting

Intro

Let’s talk about how we can improve our results by eating big and less frequently.

“So wait; you’re telling me I can spend less time preparing food, eat bigger meals, and get the same, or even better results than the traditional eat-every-two-hours thing?”

Yes.

Intermittent Fasting

Enter the wonderful concept of intermittent fasting. For those of you unfamiliar with the term, intermittent fasting is a fairly new concept within the health and fitness realm.

While fasting may not be popular among the masses, it’s gained a lot of ground within a select group of fitness folk – and it’s for good reason; it works.

Over four years ago, I found myself preparing for a photo shoot, and becoming completely obsessed with my 6 - 8 meals per day nutritional plan. By the time I was ready for my shoot, I was ready to give up on this whole ‘being ripped’ thing.And about that time, I found Martin Berkhan, who’s largely responsible for bringing the popularity of intermittent fasting to the strength and conditioning world. His solid approach is fairly simple to understand.You merely pick an 8 - hour window to consume all of your daily calories. Once the 8 hours is up, you fast for 16 hours until you approach the 8 - hour window the following day. Easy enough.For the typical trainee who hits the gym in the afternoon (say 4 - 6 p.m.), you will fast intermittently from bedtime up until about 12-2 p.m. the following day. So, if your 8-hour window begins at 2 p.m., you will cease your feeding at 10 p.m.

The goal here is to focus less on eating and planning meals, and more on the things in life that take up bigger chunks of your time. Fitness should complement your life as opposed to ruling it.

This means no breakfast outside of a few cups of coffee and no mid-morning snacks.

I’ll give you a sample of what my diet looks like so you can see how easily I implement a fasting approach to my daily life.

Training Day

8:00 a.m.
Wake, work and sip on coffee until about noon.

2:00 p.m.
Break my fast with a shake (50g protein, 50g carbs, 10-15g fat from peanut butter),
return to work.

4 p.m.
Head to the gym for an hour to train.

5 - 5:30 p.m.
Return home and prepare a large meal
(50-100g protein, 200-300g carbs, 10 - 15g fat)

9 - 10:00 p.m.
Consume my last meal
(either go out for dinner or have some lean meat, veggies, and more starch).

Rest Day

8:00 a.m.
Wake, work and sip on coffee until about noon.

2:00 p.m.
Break my fast with a shake (100g protein from cottage cheese and protein powder, 50g carbs, 10-15g fat from peanut butter), return to work.

4:00 p.m.
Go for a walk in the woods, or down to the lake.

5:00 p.m.
Return home to work some more.

9:00 p.m.
Last meal
(100g protein – usually a fatty cut of meat with veggies or a protein-heavy dairy selection consisting of yogurt, cottage cheese, etc.)

By making this change, I’ve reduced my needs to prepare multiple meals throughout the day, plus I’m able to enjoy very large, satisfying meals, which highly contributes to dietary adherence – especially when attempting to lose body fat.

For those who are unfamiliar with this approach, I’m sure you may have some questions and concerns, considering fasting is hardly publicized to the masses.

Mini-FAQ:

“I’ve always heard that eating more causes one to burn more fat and stoke the metabolic fire – is this not true?”

While this is a commonly held belief, it’s far from the truth. Multiple studies have proven that meal frequency has no bearing on metabolism. One study from the British Journal of Nutrition suggests there is no evidence that meal frequency has any bearing on weight loss when in an energy deficit [2]. Another study from 2009 compares 3 meals per day to 6 meals per day and reveals no difference in weight loss when calories and energy levels remain constant[3].  In the end, as long as protein and calorie requirements are met – the way in which this happens (meal frequency) is hardly relevant.

“Don’t I need to continually feed my body with protein to ensure proper digestion and a steady supply of amino acids to my bloodstream?”

For a good while, this has been a popular belief – the body can only absorb “x” amount of protein in a sitting (typical figures are 30-40g in a sitting). Thus, we arrive at the 6 - 8 meals per day thing to ensure we get enough protein. The good news is our bodies are much more complex and fully able to digest protein in large quantities – ensuring a steady stream of aminos in our blood to take care of the recovery and growth process.  This study reveals a standard meal of pizza (600 kcals with ~37g protein) is still not fully absorbed even 5 hours after devouring it. What if you sat down at night and had a few large chicken breasts (~100g protein) in peanut sauce (fat), some potatoes? It only makes sense that this meal will be slowly digesting for hours to come without any fear of being deficient in amino acids[4].

Need further validation on the rates of protein digestion? Then read Alan Aragon’s article on the subject.

So, there’s no need to fear muscle catabolism here. Go ahead and enjoy a bigger, protein-dense meal the next time you’re out.

Making Sense of it All

Building an amazing physique is tough. It’s not for the average, impassionate bro. It takes time, perseverance and commitment. But then again, anything worth achieving rarely ever comes without a fight.

If anything, I hope you now realize that even with limited time, you can still push towards your full potential by making effective use of your training with simpler, more efficient methods.

If you’re tired or stressed out from all the ideals around frequent eating, I encourage you to investigate and learn about intermittent fasting – then make it work for you and your schedule.

Written by:

JC Deen is the author of JCDFitness – A No-BS Approach to Looking Great Naked, where he whimsically writes about intermittent fasting, strength training and the laid-back fitness lifestyle. Stalk him out on Facebook or pester him on Twitter.

References

[1] Wernborn, Mathias, Jesper Augustsson, and Roland Thomeé. "The Influence of Frequency, Intensity, Volume and Mode of Strength Training on Whole Muscle Cross-Sectional Area in Humans." (2007): 31-32. Print.

[2] Bellisle, France, Regina McDevitt, and Andrew M. Prentice. "Meal Frequency and Energy Balance." British Journal of Nutrition 77.S1 (1997): S57. Print.

[3] Cameron, JD, MJ Cyr, and E. Coucet. "Increased Meal Frequency Does Not Promote Greater Weight Loss in Subjects Who Were Prescribed an 8-week Equi-energetic Energy-restricted Diet." British Journal of Nutrition (2010). Print.

[4] Martin, Berkhan. "Top Ten Fasting Myths Debunked (Major Update Nov 4th)." Intermittent Fasting Diet for Fat Loss, Muscle Gain and Health. Martin Berkhan, 21 Oct. 2010. Web. 02 Sept. 2011. leangains.com/2010/10/top-ten-fasting-myths-debunked.html

Posted 04 October 2011 by Michael Kory

Video: Healthy


Pita Chips

Healthy Homemade Pita Chips

You will need:

1 whole wheat pita
Olive oil
Spices of your choice

 By Michael Kory

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Posted 22 September 2011 by Michael Kory

Video: Healthy Pizza


in 10 minutes

Healthy Pizza in 10 minutes

You will need:

1 whole wheat pita
1/2 tbsp. olive oil
2 tbsp. tomato paste
Oregano
Basil
1/2 cup fat-free shredded cheese (or low-fat)
Toppings of your choice

By Michael Kory

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Posted 15 September 2011 by Anna from proteinpow

Recipe: Strawberry


Protein Fluff

Protein fluff

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of frozen strawberries
  • 1/2 cup of milk
  • 30g ON whey (I used strawberry whey but vanilla works too)
  • 1/2tsp of xanthar gum (this is optional, it gives it extra 'hold' but it works fine without it)

Instructions

Blend it all together until it's all well mixed and then, with an electric whisker, whisk it for 2 to 5 minutes (sometimes the more you whisk, the fluffier it gets but I get impatient after 2 minutes). Enjoy!!! :-D

Stats

  • 207kcals,
  • 21g carb,
  • 27g protein,
  • 2.5g fat
  • 3.8g fiber

Recipe by: Anna from proteinpow.com

Posted 23 August 2011 by Anna from proteinpow

Recipe: Banana


Protein Pancakes

Banana Protein Pancakes

Ingredients

Ingredients: 32g quinoa flakes + 192g egg whites,
56g vanilla myofusion, half of a banana, vanilla essence, grated orange peel.

Instructions:

Instructions: Throw all the ingredients together and
fry them on a non-stick pan with coconut oil

Stats:

4 big pancakes:
504 kcals,
64g protein,
41g carbs 8 fat and 7.4g fiber
(+ your topping of choice)

Recipe by Anna from proteinpow.com

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